Summer Wishlist

We’ve all been told that if you write down your goals you will be more likely to complete them. In that spirit I’m going to write down my goals for 2016 (some already completed). This will be a wish list. Not all of these things will happen, but I intend to work toward these goals.20160506_120032 Read More

Part of why I love my riding club so much is their eagerness to give back to the community. Between donating to charity as a group, organizing charity events, and escorting charity rides, I’d like to think we do a good job. There is one venue, however, that I think is more impactful than all of the others. It’s also the hardest to orchestrate: Skills days. Read More

A Reasoned Defense of Hooliganism

“If we locked up every male from ages 16 to 25, crime would essentially end overnight” argues attorney Mark Geragos. He has a point. We commit more than 90% of the murders in this nation, mostly in that age range. Between these ages the male’s prefrontal cortex is undergoing massive changes, leading to irrational decisions and increased risk taking. He’s also full of testosterone and likely fairly competitive. Since locking them up isn’t feasible, we shouldn’t come down so hard on them for how their biology leads them to act. We should give them motorcycles.Banks lake return trip Read More

On Consequence

I was 23 years old when I first saw someone die. He had been riding a motorcycle in the opposite direction I had been riding on Highway 522 in Woodinville, behaving much the same as I had. Riding fast, doing the occasional wheelie, etc. The difference was that he lost control, hit a guardrail and fell 20 feet onto a rocky median. The force of the accident had torn his shoes from his feet. His red CBR finally came to rest almost a quarter mile down the highway. I saw people surrounding someone on the side of the road and, being trained by Boy Scouts to help any time I could, I stopped. I remember standing 20 feet from this person so remarkably similar to myself, unable to bring myself to face the reality that he was dying until another Good Samaritan told me he didn’t think the guy was going to live long enough for the paramedics to show up. Read More

An Attempt at “The Good Life”

On Memorial Day, 2014, I sustained an injury that changed my life. I was working as a delivery driver for a garbage company in Seattle, building a life for myself and my then-girlfriend now-fiancee. While wrestling with a 2 yard dumpster half-filled with concrete I managed to tear my bicep out of my shoulder. That injury threw my life into disarray immediately. I went from working 55-70 hours per week and making good money to puking from painkillers and icing my arm for the next 18 months. In this time I realized that it was unlikely I’d be allowed to go back to my old job, so I had to formulate a plan for my remaining years. Going from rigid structure and never-ending workdays to zero structure and nothing but free time has been a tremendous challenge, so I’ve decided to build structure back into my life. This blog is one of the ways I intend to do that. Read More